Science News

Storm Surge: The Science of Hurricanes

Nov 09, 2017 https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Matthew_2016-10-04.jpg

By Christina Marvin Anyone who has lived through a hurricane can tell you these storms are no joke. Before accurate tracking, hurricanes had the potential to wipe out entire cities, such as the Labor Day hurricane in Key West in 1935. With better equipment, lives and property can be saved, although widespread destruction and lasting […]

Eat Your Heart Out: Growing Heart Tissue on Spinach Leaves

Apr 21, 2017 https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/3c/Vine_leaf_-_Pinot_noir.jpg

By Allyson Roberts Regenerative medicine is one of the hottest topics in biomedical science right now. Multiple labs are using inventive approaches to try and find ways to create body parts in the lab. In the United States alone, there are over 120,000 people currently on the waiting list for an organ transplant, and an […]

Dive Into the Mysterious World of Sharks

Feb 09, 2017 https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/96/Stegostoma_fasciatum_thailand.jpg

By Michelle Engle In the past few months, scientists have made some amazing discoveries about sharks. Let’s dive into the new research and what it means for sharks and scientists. In August 2016, a group of Danish scientists published a report in Science that radiocarbon dating had allowed them to investigate the lifespan of the […]

Molecular Machines – 2016 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Oct 21, 2016

By Sarah Marks For me, one of the most exciting times of the year is in early October, and it’s not just because I love fall leaves, brisk weather, and pumpkin spice lattes.  October is when science gets its time in the sun, with the Nobel Prize announcements.  A legacy of Alfred Nobel, Nobel Prizes […]

How to Recognize Bad Science

Sep 29, 2016

By Lauriel Earley Using the internet gives you access to a wealth of information, but sometimes it’s too much! How do you recognize the good information from the junk information? How do you know if the article you’re reading is true? How do you know if someone is trying to trick you? Now that Tamara […]

DNA: an eyewitness to crime

Sep 22, 2016

By Christina Marvin Crime dramas such as NCIS and Law and Order engross us with images of law enforcement blasting down city streets in pursuit of suspects, lights flashing and sirens blaring. Bringing criminals to justice often relies on the prompt ability to secure a crime scene and interview suspects. But what happens when criminals get away […]

Wading through the Shallows: Finding Accurate, In-depth Science Coverage in a Sea of Information

Sep 16, 2016 http://www.phdcomics.com/comics/archive.php?comicid=1174

By Tamara Vital Scientists communicate their findings to one another through the primary literature: papers that describe their work and are reviewed by other scientists in the field before being published in scientific journals. When I first started reading scientific papers as a young college student, I enjoyed the science, but wondered how the papers […]