Everyday Science

Dietary Supplements: #NewYearNewMe or #NewYearNewLiver ?

Jan 25, 2018 https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sports_Nutrition_Supplements.jpg

By Eva Vitucci As 2018 makes its grand entrance, so does the ever trending hashtag #NewYearNewMe. This hashtag is frequently used in reference to the undertaking of a healthier lifestyle, and for those hashtag enthusiasts, is often followed by #FitFam and #LegDay.  Shifting to a healthier lifestyle can be a monumental challenge, but often one of […]

From the Archives – Maple Trees vs. Winter: How Trees Survive and Thrive Again

Jan 18, 2018

With much of North Carolina under several inches of snow (included up to a foot in some parts of the Research Triangle!), we thought it was a good time to revisit how a familiar favorite survives in such harsh conditions. Originally published on November 12, 2016. By Christina Marvin What do you imagine when you hear […]

Wet Hair, Colds, and the Truth About Viruses

Dec 21, 2017 https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/52/Phage.jpg

By Michelle Engle As kids, we are often told, “don’t go outside with wet hair, you will catch a cold!” Is there any truth to this old saying, or is it just a persistent myth? Knowing the difference between myths and scientific facts is important for making educated decisions. But what’s even more important is […]

The Science of Snowflakes

Dec 14, 2017 https://www.flickr.com/photos/chaoticmind75/35142394270/in/album-72157626146319517/

By Chad Lloyd Flash back to 4th grade art class. “Today we are going to decorate for winter and will be making snowflakes,” your favorite art teacher says. As excitement fills the air, you and your friends rush to get paper and scissors to begin your masterpieces. After making your final cuts to the paper, […]

The Secret Behind How We Choose Our Food

Dec 07, 2017 https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:MRI_of_orbitofrontal_cortex.jpg

By Yitong Li When it comes to food choice, it’s almost an instinctual question: sometimes I want some chicken and greens for dinner and others I want some BBQ ribs and mashed potatoes. Compared to other decisions, such as which phone to buy or which shirt to put on in the morning, choosing food seems […]

Why the Flu Shot Rocks

Nov 30, 2017 https://www.nobelprize.org/educational/medicine/immunity/immune-detail.html

By Clare Gyorke When I say the flu sucks, I’m not talking about the cold you get every year – you feel crappy for a day or two, but not so crappy that you can’t watch Netflix. I’m talking about the one that starts out feeling like a cold, but progresses to feeling so bad […]

Getting into a cycle of recycling

Nov 16, 2017 https://www.flickr.com/photos/cogdog/9090732482

By Kelsey Gray In elementary school, I always looked forward to enjoying some Sunny Delight orange juice when my mom picked me up from school. One day, rather than tossing the empty bottle into the trash, I told my mom we needed to save it. When she seemed a little confused, I explained that we […]

Summertime Science

Jun 08, 2017 https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hanging_Rock_State_Park.jpg

By Julia DiFiore As the weather gets warmer and the days get longer, the countdown to summer gets shorter. While the first official day of summer isn’t until June 20, many of you have already started summer vacation. Whether your plans over the next couple of months involve a summer job, vacation, summer school, SAT […]

One potato, Two potatoes, Three potatoes, Four!

Apr 06, 2017 https://www.flickr.com/photos/usdagov/10583398185

By Kelsey Gray As the days get longer, the air gets warmer, and the sun shines brighter, we may begin to notice fresh fruits and vegetables growing around us and appearing in local grocery stores and markets. Food crops, including grains, fruits, and vegetables, are harvested to feed the growing world population of over 7 […]

Hatching a Chick: No Egg Needed

Mar 23, 2017 https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/64/Chicken-embryo-1week_old-stereomicroscope.jpg

By Michelle Engle Scientists have been attempting to find a way to directly observe the developmental process of chicks for decades. The elegant process of developing from a single fertilized cell into a cluster of heart cells, and eventually into a tiny peeping chick is fascinating, but the eggshell has kept this process hidden from […]

Sugar, spice, and everything nice: science in the kitchen

Mar 21, 2017 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capsicum#/media/File:Arrangement_of_jalape%C3%B1o,_banana,_cayenne,_chili,_and_habanero_peppers.jpg

By Mike Pablo Whether or not you know what to do with a stove, you need to eat. And, while food doesn’t have to taste good to be eaten, it certainly is nice if it does. As someone who enjoys eating, cooking, and science, today, I’m merging them all together! I hope I can convince […]

From the Heart

Feb 16, 2017 https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Diagram_of_the_human_heart_(cropped).svg

By Kelsey Gray Hearts have long been associated with the month of February. Hallmark Cards began producing Valentine’s Day cards featuring the heart in the early 1900s. The first American Heart Month was declared by President Lyndon B. Johnson and took place in February 1964. In 2003, the first National Wear Red Day was held […]

The Bacterial Life inside your Breakfast

Jan 19, 2017 https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Yogurtland_Yogurt_High_Res.jpg

By Christina Marvin Yogurt is a yummy treat, but did you know that one of the main ingredients is live bacteria? Is it dangerous to eat bacteria? Don’t worry, yogurt contains only good kinds of bacteria, not the ones that make you sick. In fact, many bacterial species used in yogurt actually help your digestive […]

Coffee Science

Dec 09, 2016

By Sarah Marks It’s the end of the semester, which means a slew of project deadlines and exams. To get through it all, many of us reach for one beverage, coffee. Coffee is complex. Beyond the most well-known component, caffeine, which gets most of us through our early morning grogginess, coffee beans contain acids that […]

Maple Trees vs. Winter: How Trees Survive and Thrive Again

Nov 12, 2016

By Christina Marvin What do you imagine when you hear people describe spending time on rural mountainsides? Country landscapes often bring to mind scenes of seemingly endless trees stretched out over mountaintops and across plains. North Carolina in particular is home to a variety of different trees, one of which is the beautiful and resilient […]

The tiny creatures that evolve with our beer industry

Oct 14, 2016

By Yitong Li What comes to your mind when you think of evolution? Giant dinosaurs with sharp fangs and powerful claws? Or giraffes stretching their necks to reach the leaves at the top of a tree? Or Charles Darwin the British gentleman with a long, dense beard? For a group of scientists in Belgium, evolution […]

Buzz Like a Bee

Sep 09, 2016

By Kelsey Gray Edited by Mike Pablo and Anna Chiarella Communication is essential for surviving and thriving in our daily lives. We communicate with others all the time. Maybe you enjoy talking about books, shopping, writing, video games, traveling? Perhaps you prefer topics such as exercise, studying, sports, relationships, or other hobbies? Regardless of your […]

Siamese Cat Science!

Aug 18, 2016

By Sarah Marks Edited by Kelsey Gray and Sam Stadmiller The internet is full of cats. They’re cute, they’re aloof, and apparently really bad at spelling. Some of the most recognizable cats on the internet, after Grumpy Cat, are Siamese cats. Their distinct coloring (dark ears, face, feet, and tail on a pale body), called point coloration, […]